Amy Cutler

Opal's Departure

2011

1800

Lithograph printed in 9 colors

31,11 × 38,42 cm

Edition of 50 copies, signed and numbered by the artist

This edition comes comes with Amy Cutler's 2011 publication Turtle Fur

In stock

This edition is published by Hatje Cantz

Pick up at / ships in 5 to 10 business days from Berlin (DE)

about this work

With faces that are both resolute and introspective, Cutler’s women symbolize the emotional complexities of real life situations. This lithograph is also in this tradition. A headless woman sits on the edge of a barrel that is filled to the brim with grain, between carefully bound suitcases and handbags, obviously ready for a journey. She wears a dress and a sweater, and carries an umbrella in her hand, yet she has no shoes and supports her feet on top of her own head, which has an unhappy, yet determined expression. Who or what has robbed the woman of her head? Is someone going to pick her up? Is she barefoot so that she can feel the ground beneath her feet? Will her supplies last? The observer asks many questions, and we wish the traveler good luck!

about Amy Cutler

Amy Cutler is known for her highly detailed compositions of austere but immaculately attired women who, with a singular focus, engage in curious activities—from sewing stripes onto tigers to delivering elixirs while wearing boot-shaped wooden stilts. Despite their fictionalized settings, the drawings are often inspired by Cutler’s own experiences and anxieties, which she brilliantly transforms into allegorical scenarios that resonate with emotional depth and humour. Seamlessly integrating subtle allusions to contemporary politics and even stories of religious martyrdom into her work, the artist is also influenced by a range of visual sources, including Persian miniatures, Japanese Ukiyo-e prints, and ethnographic dress and textiles. This exhibition takes a deeper look at Cutler’s use of material culture as a subtle narrative device and focuses particularly on her embrace of elaborate costuming and fabric patterns as a means to express her characters’ psychologies and to reinforce the narrative backstory of her compositions.

(Courtesy Museum of Contemporary Art, Madison)

 

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